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Introduction to Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) and Minority Health Disparities


Introduction to Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) and Minority Health Disparities

CME Certificate Fee: $37.50 (USD) for certificate
1.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM
Estimated time to complete this activity: 1.50 hours
Author(s): John Bormanis, PhD.
Further Author Information | Further CME Information
Meets Special CME Requirements in: Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania     Learn More >>

Course Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the National Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) standards of the USDHHS Office of Minority Health and how they impact the ethical responsibilities of medical service providers.
  • Define “health disparities” and how they disproportionately affect ethnic and racial minority populations in the United States.
  • Recognize that “ethnicity,” “race,” and “culture” are fluid categories that overlap and also include other aspects of identity that can include religion, sexual orientation, gender, class, etc.
  • Describe the practice of “cultural competence” in the health care setting.
  • Successfully navigate a Mexican American patient with limited English proficiency through the process of establishing culturally and linguistically care and obtaining referrals for treatment of her asthma.
  • Utilize the 7 basic components of asthma care and management according the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (2007).

Learning Format: Case-based, interactive online course, including mandatory assessment questions (number of questions varies by course or module). Please also read the Technical Requirements.

CME Sponsor: University of Arizona College of Medicine - Tucson
Credit Designation and Accreditation Statements >>
Current Approval Period: May 1, 2017 - April 30, 2019
Original Release Date: May 1, 2015
Most Recent Review by Author: May 1, 2015
Most Recent Review by CME Sponsor: May 1, 2017
Financial Support Received: Supported by federal HRSA grant #D34HP24460.
Introduction to Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) and Minority Health Disparities
1.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM
Current Approval Period: May 1, 2017 - April 30, 2019
Financial Support Received: Supported by federal HRSA grant #D34HP24460.

ACCME/AMA PRA Accreditation Statement

The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Tucson is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Tucson designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.


CME Office Contact Information and CME Disclosure

The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Tucson
Office of Continuing Medical Education
520-626-7832
uofacme@email.arizona.edu

The following University of Arizona College of Medicine - Tucson CME Reviewers, Activity Directors, or Planning Committee Members have no relevant financial relationships with commercial interests that could constitute a conflict of interest with the proposed activity:

Robert Amend, M.Ed.
Randa Kutob, MD

Introduction to Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) and Minority Health Disparities
About the Author

John Bormanis, PhD

Dr. Bormanis is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine in Tucson, AZ. Dr. Bormanis' research interests include cross-cultural communication, medical education, gender studies, and the intersection of health and spirituality. Dr. Bormanis is a co-author of the Virtual Lecture Hall course "Delivering Culturally Competent Care: Managing Type 2 Diabetes in Diverse Populations."

Disclosure: Dr. Bormanis states that he does not have any financial arrangements that could constitute a conflict of interest.

Introduction to Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) and Minority Health Disparities
Ratings (373 responses)
How would you rate this program overall?
Average Rating: 4.13/5.00
How well were the learning objectives of this program met?
Average Rating: 4.30/5.00
How relevant was the information in this program to your clinical practice?
Average Rating: 4.25/5.00
Likelihood you will make a change in practice behavior based on your participation in this activity.
Average Rating: 4.00/5.00
User Comments
by Hidden | Sep 27, 2016
Excellent course and very informative about the CLAS standards
by Efren Bernal | Aug 28, 2016
This was a nice refresher. Luckily I have a lot of training in culturally competent care being a Mexican American.
by Ricardo Reyes | Aug 28, 2016
As a minority student (Mexican), I found this activity incredibly gratifying. It is essential to acknowledge and introduce racial and economic health disparities this early in our medical development.
by muhammad arif | Aug 28, 2016
An excellent course!
by CHAN-TAL JACKSON | Aug 28, 2016
Thank you for requiring us, as medical students, to take this course. Not enough individuals are aware of how a person's ethnicity, race, culture and other factors influence outcome at varying levels of society....hopefully this will have increased that awareness.
by Hidden | Aug 28, 2016
The information, images, testing was all informative. However, the presentation of the material was overwhelming based on the sheer quantity of information presented at a given time. Additionally, the course overall seemed a bit idealistic. In a perfect world, providing culturally and linguistically relevant care would not ever be a concern. Unfortunately, the reality is that catering to every group (especially as it relates to language barriers) will be tough, if not impossible. What happens if I have a patient come in who only speaks a rare dialect that very few people speak? What am I supposed to do here? Also, what if none of my patients are from a particular minority group and then I have one or two patients from a particular minority...am I supposed to change my practice to accommodate one or two people? The economics behind this (recruit and hiring new staff to accommodate their linguistic/cultural needs, paying for an interpreter line, making new patient information pamphlets, etc etc) is expensive and time-consuming. The practical application of the lessons taught was not discussed in this core, and unfortunately, this is probably a large reason that cultural and linguistic barriers exist.
Introduction to Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) and Minority Health Disparities
This course meets general AMA PRA Category 1 CME Credit(s)TM requirements in states that have a CME requirement.

Based on information from state licensing authorities, this program meets special CME requirements in these states:

Connecticut Cultural Competence CME
Started with licensing periods of October 1, 2010.
New Jersey Cultural Competence CME
Pennsylvania Risk Management / Patient Safety CME

View other courses meeting Special State Requirements
Introduction to Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) and Minority Health Disparities
Technical Requirements

This web-based activity is offered online and requires an always-on connection to the Internet (the activity cannot be downloaded). The activity works on PC or Mac computers and most tablet computers. The activity should work with the newer versions of major Internet browsers, including Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, and Safari. JavaScript should be enabled in all browsers, and Popups and first party cookies need to be accepted from www.VLH.com. You should also have the latest, free Adobe Reader installed for reading documents.

For additional information, read the Technical Assistance FAQ.

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